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Saturday
Sep082018

What is the most difficult thing in leadership today?

As leaders, there are many things we could, would, label as “Difficult.” Brad Lomenick lists quite a few and then picks one of them that is most difficult for him. How many reading this would agree with Brad?

Originally posted by Brad Lomenick

So what do you think is the most difficult thing in Leadership today? 

Casting Vision in a compelling way.

Trusting your team.

Planning for the future.

Motivating your staff.

Saying no.

Saying yes.

Building long-lasting strategic relationships with partners and vendors.

Delegation.

Managing change. 

Constant innovation and creativity improvement. 

Hiring new talent.

Firing someone.

Confrontation.

Making things happen.

Growing the organization.

Investing in the personal and professional growth of your team/organization.

Creating the culture. 

Creating revenue to feed growth and impact. 

Leading yourself and constantly improving. 

Balancing the tension of boss and friend. 

And on and on and on.

In my opinion, one of the most difficult things in leadership is balancing the tension of being friends with your team, while also being their boss and demanding excellence and execution. My theory has always been hire the best, and if they happen to be your friends, that's great. 

To me, having your friends on your team is the best scenario. I would much rather have my friends on my team than not. But it creates a constant tension that has to be managed. 

Another difficult piece of leadership today is the rapid pace of change and innovation. As soon as you think you're innovative, you're probably not. 

What about you? 

What for you is the most difficult thing in your Leadership realities these days?

 

 

 

 

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