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Monday
Feb132017

Hidden Figures...what a movie...what a lesson on leadership!

My wife Susan and I try to go to a movie each week. It can take some time looking at all the options and deciding on one that we would both enjoy.

This past week we saw “Hidden Figures,” a movie about three brave and extremely gifted African American ladies who fought tradition and racism and made some incredible contributions to the United States Space Program. We were both inspired in numerous ways. I highly recommend it for the whole family, especially if you have young daughters who could use some inspiration.

In the past, I’ve said that if I’ve read a book or seen a movie and come away with one great idea it was worth every penny.

During the movie “Hidden Figures” one of the men was saying to another that there was a danger at hand which might make things go a bit slower, to which the other responded,

“I’ll tell you what’s dangerous, inaction and indecision.”

I turned my cell phone to one side so as not to bother Susan and typed that statement into Evernote for future reference.

As I’ve been thinking about this statement, here are a few observations related to leadership:

1.  Inaction and indecision at the top will eventually negatively affect the entire group, church or organization.

2.  One of the marks of a good leader is the ability and the courage to make the tough decisions when they need to be made.

3.  Fear of people’s opinions and fear of failure often hinder leaders from making the tough decisions. (Proverb 29:25)

4.  No matter what decision you make, or don’t make, someone will probably not like it and be reluctant to support it--at least at first. Can you live with being unpopular for a time--maybe a long time?

5.  A leader is a person who makes decisions, some of which are right. No leader (except Jesus) ever makes the perfect decision every time. But we learn from poor decisions and hopefully make better ones in the future.

6.  Refusing to make a decision which is difficult is, in itself, a decision.

7.  You may never have all the information you’d like to have in order to make a difficult decision, but do you have enough?

As a leader may you, by his grace, be bold and courageous in making the tough decisions and not slip into inactivity and indecision!

 

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